Alkek Library's Tumblr is focused on events, the new learning commons, and sharing our coolness with the Texas State University community.

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zenonzequel:

ALRIIIIIIGHT

It’s National Coffee Day! Go over to Starbucks or Paws Market in LBJ, then take a look at the coffee-related resources we have in the library collection, such as the streaming documentary Black Gold.

zenonzequel:

ALRIIIIIIGHT

It’s National Coffee Day! Go over to Starbucks or Paws Market in LBJ, then take a look at the coffee-related resources we have in the library collection, such as the streaming documentary Black Gold.


"The Grand Prize went to a team of three 16-year-old girls from Ireland: Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey, and Sophie Healy-Thow. Their project, “Combating The Global Food Crisis: Diazotroph Bacteria As A Cereal Crop Growth Promoter,” explored different bacterial strains that could shorten the germination time of cereal crops like oats and barley. Growing food is becoming monumentally important, as climate change threatens food crops, and the increasing global population is becoming incredibly demanding.” - IFL Science

"The Grand Prize went to a team of three 16-year-old girls from Ireland: Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey, and Sophie Healy-Thow. Their project, “Combating The Global Food Crisis: Diazotroph Bacteria As A Cereal Crop Growth Promoter,” explored different bacterial strains that could shorten the germination time of cereal crops like oats and barley. Growing food is becoming monumentally important, as climate change threatens food crops, and the increasing global population is becoming incredibly demanding.” - IFL Science

Write for JSTOR Daily!

jstor:

JSTOR is starting an online magazine - JSTOR Daily. It’s a scholarly bent on news and culture and it’s live right now but will officially launch next week. We’re accepting pitches from writers on articles - link to the submission guidelines here (and we pay our writers, too!). 

So check it out and let me know if you have any questions or thoughts! Also, submit away. 

socimages:

The average prisoner is visited only twice.
By Chris Uggen, PhD
Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better — both while they’re incarcerated and after they’re released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation.
The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure shows, prisoners who are younger, white or Latino, and had been incarcerated less frequently tend to have more visits. Community factors also shaped visitation patterns: prisoners who come from high incarceration areas or communities with greater charitable activity also received more visits.  
There are some pretty big barriers to improving visitation rates, including: (1) distance (most inmates are housed more than 100 miles from home); (2) lack of transportation; (3) costs associated with missed work; and, (4) child care. While these are difficult obstacles to overcome, the authors conclude that corrections systems can take steps to reduce these barriers, such as housing inmates closer to their homes, making facilities and visiting hours more child-friendly, and reaching out to prisoners’ families regarding the importance of visitation, both before and during incarceration.
Cross-posted at Public Criminology.
Chris Uggen is a professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota and the author of  Locked Out: Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy, with Jeff Manza. You can follow him at his blog and on twitter.

socimages:

The average prisoner is visited only twice.

By Chris Uggen, PhD

Prisoners who can maintain ties to people on the outside tend to do better — both while they’re incarcerated and after they’re released. A new Crime and Delinquency article by Joshua Cochran, Daniel Mears, and William Bales, however, shows relatively low rates of visitation.

The study was based on a cohort of prisoners admitted into and released from Florida prisons from November 2000 to April 2002. On average, inmates only received 2.1 visits over the course of their entire incarceration period. Who got visitors? As the figure shows, prisoners who are younger, white or Latino, and had been incarcerated less frequently tend to have more visits. Community factors also shaped visitation patterns: prisoners who come from high incarceration areas or communities with greater charitable activity also received more visits.  

There are some pretty big barriers to improving visitation rates, including: (1) distance (most inmates are housed more than 100 miles from home); (2) lack of transportation; (3) costs associated with missed work; and, (4) child care. While these are difficult obstacles to overcome, the authors conclude that corrections systems can take steps to reduce these barriers, such as housing inmates closer to their homes, making facilities and visiting hours more child-friendly, and reaching out to prisoners’ families regarding the importance of visitation, both before and during incarceration.

Cross-posted at Public Criminology.

Chris Uggen is a professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota and the author of  Locked Out: Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy, with Jeff Manza. You can follow him at his blog and on twitter.

entertainmentweekly:

For the fifth year in a row, this picture book about a same-sex penguin couple and their adorable new chick is at the top of the American Library Association’s top ten list of the year’s most frequently challenged books. And here we thought book banning types loved penguins!

This is my book selection for today’s Banned Books Week Read Out. Stop by the Instant Theater in Alkek Library until 4:30pm today and read a selection of your favorite Banned Book (or sign up for a slot ahead of time).
Free coffee and cookies while they last!

entertainmentweekly:

For the fifth year in a row, this picture book about a same-sex penguin couple and their adorable new chick is at the top of the American Library Association’s top ten list of the year’s most frequently challenged books. And here we thought book banning types loved penguins!

This is my book selection for today’s Banned Books Week Read Out. Stop by the Instant Theater in Alkek Library until 4:30pm today and read a selection of your favorite Banned Book (or sign up for a slot ahead of time).

Free coffee and cookies while they last!