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A new study claims to have potentially solved a famous puzzle in social science: Why some nations are always so damn happy. The secret? Be Danish.

fastcompany:

Jacques Cousteau’s Grandson Comes Up From 31 Days Under The Sea
"For the first time, we were able to invite the world in live during the 31 days on a Cousteau expedition. The fact that you could see the curiosity in kids, and even in older adults, was a huge reward for me personally because I believe we sparked something that hadn’t happened to the ocean since my grandfather’s era."
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fastcompany:

Jacques Cousteau’s Grandson Comes Up From 31 Days Under The Sea

"For the first time, we were able to invite the world in live during the 31 days on a Cousteau expedition. The fact that you could see the curiosity in kids, and even in older adults, was a huge reward for me personally because I believe we sparked something that hadn’t happened to the ocean since my grandfather’s era."

Read More>

fastcompany:

You might be rocking headphones while you read this—but does what’s playing make you better at your job?
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fastcompany:

You might be rocking headphones while you read this—but does what’s playing make you better at your job?

Read More>

ucsciencetoday:

A UC Santa Cruz study found that dancers can improve the ability to do complex moves by walking through them slowly and encoding the movement with a cue through ‘marking’.
Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues (including a UC Irvine collaborator) were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”
Their findings suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice and allow dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly. As Warburton describes:

Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material.

It’s possible that this area of research can extend to other kinds of activities, like language acquisition. Stay tuned!

Here’s a link to that study in Psychological Science.

ucsciencetoday:

A UC Santa Cruz study found that dancers can improve the ability to do complex moves by walking through them slowly and encoding the movement with a cue through ‘marking’.

Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues (including a UC Irvine collaborator) were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”

Their findings suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice and allow dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly. As Warburton describes:

Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material.

It’s possible that this area of research can extend to other kinds of activities, like language acquisition. Stay tuned!

Here’s a link to that study in Psychological Science.

(Source: cinyma)